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The Dictionary of English Nautical Language Database: Search Results

  Your search returned 536 matches.
 Pages: [<<] ... 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 [>>]
Term: statute mile (n)
Definition: A mile as customarilly measured ashore, that is 5280 feet. The statute mile is usually used for chart scales on inland rivers and lakes.

Term: staunch (v)
Definition: To stop water flowing into a vessel.
See Also: stanch

Term: staunch (adj)
Definition: Watertight and sturdy.

Term: stave (v)
Definition: To crush in the hull of a boat. To be crushed or stove in

Term: stay (v)
Definition: 1) To support using wires or ropes. 2) To tack.

Term: stay (n)
Definition: A stout cable or rope used to support a mast fore and aft.
See Also: shroud, forestay, backstay

Term: stays, in stays (adj)
Definition: Pertaining to the situation when a tacking sailboat does not fall off on the opposite tack, but stops in the eye of the wind and loses all way.
See Also: in irons

Term: staysail (n)
Definition: A triangular sail hoisted on a stay with hanks.

Term: steady (adv)
Definition: A command to the helmsman to maintain the course carefully.

Term: steady as she goes (adv)
Definition: A command to the helmsman to observe the compass direction on the present heading, and maintain that course.

Term: steadying sail (n)
Definition: A small sturdy sail mounted low in the rigging and sheeted close to afford the vessel more stability in heavy seas.

Term: stealth (adj)
Definition: The technology of ship design that reduces radar returns and makes the ship difficult to detect. Sloping shapes deflect radar signals and make the ship virtually invisible.

Term: stealth (adj)
Definition: The technology of ship design that reduces radar returns and makes the ship difficult to detect. Sloping shapes deflect radar signals and make the ship virtually invisible. The technology also extends to wake reduction and dampening engine and propeller noise.

Term: steam bent (adj)
Definition: Describing a frame that has been softened in a steam box and then forcibly bent into the proper shape. Steam bent frames have some spring to them and are less likely to fracture from pounding in the seas since the grain follows the curve of the frame.
See Also: bent frame, sawn frame

Term: steam, steaming (v)
Definition: To operate a ship under steam power.

Term: steamboat (n)
Definition: A vessel powered by steam engine, usually referring to conversions of old time sailing vessels and river boats.

Term: steamer (n)
Definition: Any vessel with a steam engine for the main propulsion system, but usually referring to passenger ships.

Term: steamship (n)
Definition: A ship powered by steam engine.

Term: steer (v)
Definition: To direct the course of a vessel by controlling a rudder or an oar at the stern In practice steering is done by hand at a tiller or wheel, or electrically by an automatic pilot.

Term: steerage (n)
Definition: The lowest class of passenger accomodation on a ship, in the lowest part of the hull where the mechanical equipment for steering is located.

Term: steerageway (n)
Definition: 1) The minimum speed of a vessel that provides sufficient movement of water over the rudder to control direction 2) Enough open water around a vessel to maneuver.

Term: steering board (n)
Definition: A long oar mounted astern and used to steer ancient Egyptian and Viking vessels. The steering board was customarily mounted on the right side of the ship (starboard side) forcing the vessel to dock against the other side (port side).
See Also: port, starboard, larboard

Term: steering wheel (n)
Definition: A spoked wheel on the steering shaft allowing a good purchase and a mechanical advantage enabling the helmsman to turn and steer the vessel.
See Also: wheel, helm

Term: steersman (n)
Definition: One who steers the ship under direction of the deck officer.
See Also: helmsman

Term: steeve (v)
Definition: 1) To stow in a ship’s hold. 2) To rake a bowsprit upward.


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