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The Dictionary of English Nautical Language Database: Search Results

  Your search returned 131 matches.
 Pages: [<<] 1 2 3 4 5 6 [>>]
Term: hike, hike out (v)
Definition: To lean out over the weather side of a small sailboat to balance the boat and reduce heeling.
See Also: movable ballast

Term: hike, hiking (v)
Definition: To use the weight of the bodies of the crewmembers as ballast by leaning far out on the weather side of the sailboat to reduce heeling.

Term: hiker (n)
Definition: A crewmember who extends his body over the weather rail to keep the boat balanced in a reach.
See Also: hike

Term: hiking stick (n)
Definition: An extension mounted on the end of the tiller so that the helmsman can steer while hiking.
See Also: hike

Term: hiking strap (n)
Definition: A foothold secured to the centerboard trunk, used by sailing crewmembers so they are able to lean far out over the weather side to balance the boat and reduce heeling.
See Also: trapeze

Term: hit the deck (exc)
Definition: An order to arise from berths and go on duty, suggesting the thumping of feet on the deck.
See Also: bare a hand

Term: hitch (n)
Definition: A bend thrown into a rope to secure it to a fitting.
See Also: knot

Term: hobby horse (v)
Definition: To pitch repeatedly. “In short seas, the boat tends to hobby horse.”

Term: hockle (n)
Definition: A knob of cordage which forms when the line is twisted opposite the lay. The knob weakens the line and makes it impossible for the line to run freely through a block.
See Also: hockle (v)

Term: hockle (v)
Definition: To acquire a knob in a bight of cordage, caused by twisting the line against the lay. Such damage, caused by improper coiling or rough handling, weakens the line and causes it to jam in blocks.
See Also: hockle (n)

Term: hog islander (n)
Definition: A production cargo ship built at the Hog Island Shipyards in Philadelphia during the first World War.
See Also: liberty ship, victory ship

Term: hog, or hogg, or hogged (adj)
Definition: Describing a vessel that is sagging at the ends when hauled or careened indicating that the ship is losing integrity in its timbers, and that the ship has not been braced well.
See Also: sag

Term: hoist (n)
Definition: 1) A block and tackle mechanism designed for lifting heavy gear. 2) The dimension of a sail or flag along the leech.

Term: hoist (v)
Definition: To lift or pull up heavy gear by using block and tackle powered either by human muscles or by machine.

Term: hold (n)
Definition: The part of the belowdecks area of a ship which is used for carrying cargo, as in: “Her hold is full of cod.”
See Also: compartment

Term: hold (v)
Definition: 1) To grab fast, as an anchor. 2) To maintain a course, as in “Hold on 35 degrees.”
See Also: holding ground

Term: holding ground (n)
Definition: Referring to the capability of the sea bottom to provide a secure anchorage.

Term: holding tank (n)
Definition: A closed container mounted in the sewage system on board which collects waste products for treatment or discharge.
See Also: marine toilet

Term: hole, holed (v)
Definition: To stave in a hull, or cause a breach, as in “The boat was holed by an uncharted shipwreck.”

Term: holiday (n)
Definition: A surface area that was missed during painting or varnishing.

Term: holystone (n)
Definition: A soft porous stone block that was used to scrub wooden decks, so called because it brought seamen to their knees.
See Also: bear, bible

Term: holystone (v)
Definition: To scrub the deck using a porous stone.

Term: home port (n)
Definition: The port of origin listed on the documentation of a vessel, and displayed on hull lettering.

Term: hood (n)
Definition: A shaped cover for a hatch to keep spray from going below.

Term: hood ends (n)
Definition: The ends of planking where they fit into the rabbet at the stem and stern of the vessel.


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