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The Dictionary of English Nautical Language Database: Search Results

  Your search returned 210 matches.
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Term: full and by (adv)
Definition: Making best speed to weather by keeping the sails full; sailing close-hauled but not pinching; that is, born off enough to keep the sails driving. This direction to the helmsman is a compromise since the ship will sail faster, but not as close to the actual course to the destination. Ashore: referring to a favorable compromise.
See Also: close hauled, pinching

Term: full batten (adj)
Definition: Describing a sail having battens across its full width from leach to luff. Junk rig.

Term: full keel (adj)
Definition: Referring to a vessel whose design features a keel stretching the length of the boat.

Term: full keel (n)
Definition: The fixed vertical underwater plane of traditional sailboats and sailing ships, extending nearly the full length of the vessel, which provides the boat lateral stability.
See Also: fin keel, keel, ballast keel

Term: full rigged (adj)
Definition: Designation for a ship fitted with at least three masts, each carrying square sails.
See Also: ship rigged

Term: funnel (n)
Definition: A smokestack or pipe, usually featuring a decorative cowling, for venting engine exhaust gasses from a ship.
See Also: stack, smokestack

Term: furl (v)
Definition: To neatly roll or wrap a sail and secure it to a spar with light lashings.

Term: furler (n)
Definition: The spool mechanism of a self-furling sail.
See Also: roller furling, self furling

Term: futtock (s) (n)
Definition: The lower parts of the sawn frames of a wooden ship. The frames are made from several parts joined by scarfs; each piece, usually cut from straight grain timber, is referred to as a futtock. (From “foot hook”)

Term: futtock shroud (n)
Definition: An iron bar which connects the topmast rigging with the lower mast.


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