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The Dictionary of English Nautical Language Database: Search Results

  Your search returned 297 matches.
 Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 [>>]
Term: back (v)
Definition: 1) To catch the wind on the forward side of the sail; as in: “To heave to, I put the helm over and back the staysail.” 2) To change wind direction in a counter clockwise direction with the movement of weather systems, often a sign of storm. “The wind is backing into the east.”
See Also: aback

Term: back and fill (v)
Definition: To alternately back and fill the sails of a ship as a means of steering when the rudder is ineffectual, as when drifting down river or with a current.
See Also: back

Term: back splice (n)
Definition: A splice at the bitter end of a rope in which the unlayed parts are woven back on the bight to form an end that will not fray.

Term: backbone (n)
Definition: The heavy timbers that form the main fore-and-aft structure of a wooden ship, to which the keel and all the frames are fastened.

Term: backing block (n)
Definition: A sturdy piece of wood secured inboard behind a planking joint to provide extra strength.
See Also: knee, gusset

Term: backing rudders (n)
Definition: Pairs of rudders, mounted forward of the propeller in tow boats, which improve manoeuvrability when the vessel is going astern.
See Also: flanking rudders, tow boat, tug boat

Term: backstay (n)
Definition: A wire or rope support extending from the masthead aft and fastening to chain plates abaft the step or at the stern
See Also: running backstay

Term: backwash (n)
Definition: The turbulent motion of water produced by the thrust of a propeller or oars. Wash.

Term: backwater (v)
Definition: To stop a pulling boat or canoe suddenly by rowing or paddling in the opposite direction

Term: backwind (v)
Definition: To ease the main sheet so that the wind from the jib causes a luff, slowing the boat.
See Also: back

Term: baggywrinkles (n pl)
Definition: Chafing gear fashioned out of old hemp rope and wound on the mast shrouds to protect the sails from damage.
See Also: chafing gear
(Click on image to enlarge.)

Term: bail (v)
Definition: 1) To clear water out of a boat by dipping it up with a container and throwing it over the side; as in: “The canoe was leaking, so he had to bail frequently.” 2) To pump water out of a boat.

Term: bail, bailer (n)
Definition: A bucket or dipper used for removing bilgewater from a boat.

Term: balanced helm (n)
Definition: A combination of sails and rudder and mast positioning that leaves the helm with no tendancy to turn either to weather or lee.
See Also: weather helm, lee helm

Term: balanced rudder (n)
Definition: A rudder that has a small portion of the blade forward of the axis, so that it will turn with less effort.

Term: bald headed (adj)
Definition: Describing a ship that is rigged without any topmasts. As the age of steam ships began to overwhelm the wind-driven ships of the 19th century, some schooners and other sailing ships were altered to steam propulsion, yet continued to carry shortened rigging.
See Also: topmast, steam

Term: ballantine (v)
Definition: To flake the foresail halyards in a large coil, then three overlapping smaller coils within, then repeating. The system is used by schoonermen to keep the halyards ready to run free in the event the sail must be doused quickly. (From the logo of Ballantine Ale. Jargon) Thanks to Lindsey Philpott
See Also: flake

Term: ballast (n)
Definition: Heavy weights installed deep in the hull to adjust the draft of a ship and improve stability. Early ships used stones cut square which were often later used at loading ports as paving stones. Modern vessels use lead weights, or (in the case of tankers) seawater.
See Also: in ballast

Term: ballast keel (n)
Definition: The fixed vertical underwater plane of traditional sailboats and sailing ships, extending nearly the full length of the vessel, providing the boat lateral stability.
See Also: full keel, keel

Term: ballentine (v)
Definition: To flake the foresail halyards in a large coil, then three overlapping smaller coils within, then repeating. The system is used by schoonermen to keep the halyards ready to run free in the event the sail must be doused quickly. (From the logo of Ballantine Ale. Jargon) Thanks to Lindsey Philpott
See Also: flake

Term: band (n)
Definition: A long strip of reinforcing canvas sewn on the sail at points of greatest strain.

Term: bank (n)
Definition: 1) A large bottom feature in offshore waters that rises up nearer the surface and provides a rich environment for sealife. 2) A rowing bench.
See Also: shoal, bar, Grand Banks, sunker, ledge

Term: banker (n)
Definition: A fishing ship working the codfishing banks off Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.

Term: banks dory (n)
Definition: A flat-bottom straight-sided fishing boat, once used as a launch from cod fishing ships on the Grand Banks.
See Also: dory
Blog Link: http://seatalk.blogspot.com/2006/10/dory.html

Term: bar (n)
Definition: 1) A shoal usually composed of sand or sediment transported by currents causing an obstruction to navigation, usually a shoal lying just offshore the entrance to a harbour making passage possible only when there is sufficient tide. (from bar; to restrict or prohibit.) 2) A shifting sedimentary shoal found in navigable rivers such as the Mississippi; as in: “Only a fool would try to cross the bar without knowing the tides.”
See Also: shoal


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